27 jun

Corruption and Human Rights Violations Against Lyme Doctors, Scientists and Parents Now on United Nations Record

Corruption and Human Rights Violations Against Lyme Doctors, Scientists and Parents Now on United Nations Record

The 2018 Report ‘The Situation of the Human Rights Defenders of Lyme and Relapsing Fever Borreliosis Patients’ was submitted to Special Rapporteur

Corruption and Human Rights Violations Against Lyme Doctors, Scientists and Parents Now on United Nations Record

The 2018 Report ‘The Situation of the Human Rights Defenders of Lyme and Relapsing Fever Borreliosis Patients’ was submitted to Special Rapporteur Michel Forst and to Special Rapporteur Dr. Dainius Puras of the United Nations in March 2018. This resulted in a meeting between United Nations Human Rights Council Special Rapporteur Forst and medical professionals, scientists, human rights experts and advocates on June 5, 2018 in Geneva, Switzerland.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – June 12, 2018. The United Nations (UN) Special Rapporteur for Human Rights Defenders, Michel Forst, heard presentations on multiple countries from the all voluntary Ad Hoc Committee for Health Equity in ICD11 Borreliosis Codes, whose global members are dedicated to addressing the borreliosis pandemic.

Jenna Luché-Thayer, Director of the Ad Hoc Committee, gave an overview from the 2018 Report ‘The Situation of the Human Rights Defenders of Lyme and Relapsing Fever Borreliosis Patients’ that was followed by representatives sharing cases from their countries. She started by contrasting scenarios where the public recognition of human rights issues differs. For example, most people recognize the devotion to human rights of the journalist who goes into a war zone to find and share the truth of innocent people brutalized by war crimes and the risks taken by the persons who organize to free children from international sex trafficking. These defenders of human rights can be easily identified because they are working to address situations we all can recognize as horrific.

In contrast, the healthcare systems across the globe are largely recognized as flawed but not intentionally horrendous. However, increasing numbers of scholarly publications have documented how these healthcare systems have become quietly corrupted and this has led to a global healthcare situation wherein “criminal activities have become normalized”, according to Dr. Dainius Pūras, the UN Special Rapporteur on the right to health.

The defenders of Lyme and relapsing fever borreliosis patients include medical professionals, doctors, scientists, patients and advocates fighting for the health human rights of this patient group. The Report shows how many of these defenders are routinely defamed, their freedoms to associate and speak restricted, and their livelihoods are threatened. It also shows how parental rights of parents of severely ill children are routinely violated by State Actors.

According to the October 24, 2017 presentation to the UN General Assembly by Dainius Pūras, “In many countries, health is among the most corrupt sectors; this has significant implications for equality and non-discrimination.

This second Report by the Ad Hoc Committee supports his findings. It details how financial motivations shared among a faction in a medical society, their associates, State Actors and insurers have contributed to a global situation whereby doctors, scientists and parents are attacked because they defend these patients’ rights to health, bodily integrity and life. It is not uncommon for these defenders’ reputations, livelihoods and finances to be ruined — doctors lose their licenses, scientists lose access to research monies and parental rights are violated when ill children under treatment that meet internationally accepted standards are seized from their homes.

Jenna Luché-Thayer, a human rights expert with 33 years of experience in 42 nations reported how the case definition of Lyme borreliosis (LB) was changed by colluding US State Actors and certain members of the Infectious Disease Society of America (IDSA) and that the timing of these changes concurred with the launch of a failed Lyme vaccine, promotion of an unreliable, yet profitable diagnostic test system and the unwillingness of US insurers to cover the chronic or persistent form of the disease as they moved into the ‘managed care’ model.

She noted how the revised LB case definition removed most references to the debilitating symptoms, disabling and potentially fatal complications, persistence and severity of the disease and the unreliable diagnostic technologies. She also noted that contrary to the case definition, over 200 patents — held by IDSA members, State Actors and associates — reflect these serious and life-threatening complications, persistence of the disease and how the infection is often missed by the unreliable serology diagnostic technology.

Luché-Thayer detailed how the current situation of these human rights defenders and this patient group shows violations of articles found in eleven international and/or regional human rights treatises and conventions.

She stated that it appears the corruption started in the early 1990s is reflected in the 2006 IDSA Guidelines that have been promoted globally and also appears to have shaped the World Health Organization’s (WHO) International Classification of Diseases (ICD) codes for the disease.

She stated the Report shows how this corruption appears to be globally organized across institutions such as the Association of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases of Canada, European Union Concerted Action on Lyme Borreliosis (currently defunct) European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases’ Study Group for Lyme Borreliosis (ESGBOR) and State Actors and is driving unnecessary suffering, death and bankruptcy among this patient group.

The former Senior Advisor to the United Nations and U.S. government asked, “There is universal agreement that prisoners have a right to medical care. Precisely what is the difference between a ‘prisoner of war’ and ‘an eight-year-old boy’ being denied medically necessary antimicrobial care? Seizing the business of a political opposition party leader is prohibited. Precisely what is the difference between ‘seizing the businesses from a political opposition party leader’ and a medical board with members representing one medical society ‘closing down the business of a medical doctor that belongs to a competing medical society’?”

Jim Wilson, President of CanLyme, and Jennifer Kravis, co-founder of LymeHope, lawyer and mother of a daughter with tick borne diseases, testified about the situation in Canada. Only two percent of all Canadian doctors have ever been under investigation by their respective provincial Colleges of Physicians and Surgeons whereas nearly 100 percent of the doctors who diagnose and treat LB clinically have either been harassed by their respective provincial Colleges of Physicians and Surgeons to the point they gave up their medical licenses, or were forced to stop seeing Lyme patients.

Dr. Kenneth Liegner (USA) spoke about how he used to cooperate with the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and detected the Lyme infection in the spinal fluid of his patient, Vicki Logan, despite prior antibiotic treatment.  Early on, her private health insurer covered extended intravenous antibiotic treatment which improved her condition. Later, when in a nursing home and under Medicaid, her intravenous antibiotic treatment was suspended. While Liegner sought mechanisms for Medicaid reimbursement, Vicki experienced grand mal seizures and was transferred to a local hospital where Liegner did not have privileges. There she was found to have low blood pressure, her condition was not investigated and her family was persuaded to support a ‘do not resuscitate’ order. She subsequently died. An autopsy revealed ongoing neurologic Lyme disease and an acute heart attack that was neither diagnosed nor treated. Her case exemplifies the discrimination persons with Lyme experience.

Special Rapporteur Forst also heard of how many of Liegner’s colleagues were bullied into silence or submission; many of them losing their licenses or going bankrupt because of legal costs to fight the allegations made by insurance companies and supported by certain IDSA members. For example, defender Dr. Joseph Burrascano anticipated his own attacks in his 1993 Senate testimony on the apparent corruption and the unethical obstruction to diagnostics and care experienced by this patient group. Liegner also made a point of saying ‘it was not patients who made these allegations’.

French Professor Christian Perronne is an internationally renowned Infectious and Tropical Diseases specialist with over 300 scientific publications and has played an advisory role to WHO. Perronne told the Special Rapporteur how, following his 2016 presentation on LB at France’s Academy National of Medicine, he was publicly called a “terrorist” by former the President of the Academy, Professor Marc Gentilini.

The Ad Hoc Committee recognizes there are other patient groups and defenders’ experiencing similar human rights violations, and with the increasing corruption found in the health sector globally, these violations are trending across more groups.  Emeritus Professor Malcolm Hooper (UK) testified how the defenders of an estimated 15-30 million people with Myalgic Encephalomyelitis diagnosis (also known as ‘chronic fatigue syndrome’) are similarly attacked and discredited. He shared how the guidelines for ME treatment also appear to be riddled with conflicts of interests, fraudulent science and harm patients’ health and obstruct their access to disability payments.

While in Geneva, Dutch social scientist and human rights researcher Huib Kraaijeveld and other Ad Hoc Committee members discussed these matters with officials from the Dutch Ministry of Health and Embassy. Ad Hoc members including Dr. Anne Fierlafijn (Belgium), retired senior engineer Michael Cook (UK), biologist Dr. Barbaros Çetin (Turkey), media expert Torben Thomsen (Denmark), human rights expert Dr. Astrid Stuckelberger (Switzerland), psychiatrist Dr. Ursula Talib (Switzerland), scientist Dr. Mualla McManus (Australia) and advocate Theresa Denham (USA) also met with an array of internationally recognized human rights leaders and advisors, documentary film makers, and a number of persons in the Swiss medical system and UN personnel with personal experience of Lyme.

To note, the WHO’s ICD codes for Lyme borreliosis are still inadequate and outdated. When Ad Hoc member Stuckelberger contacted WHO to set a meeting to discuss the LB codes, she received written communications stating that ‘WHO has no person for Lyme borreliosis’– one of the fastest growing vector borne diseases in the world and officially ranked by the European Union as one of the top public health threats in Europe. These inadequate codes may be why in West Africa many persons misdiagnosed with debilitating drug resistant malaria were eventually found to be suffering from borreliosis infection.

According to Ad Hoc Committee founder Luché-Thayer, “Every time a doctor who defends the human rights of their Lyme patients is taken out of business, an estimated 10,000 people lose access to diagnosis and care. This global all-voluntary organization will continue to document the human rights violations and corruption surrounding this borreliosis pandemic; we are committed to addressing these self-serving, financially-motivated threats to global health.”

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18 apr

Infection Found in Patients with Persistent Symptoms of Lyme Disease

A previous study from Tulane University showed that the Lyme spirochete could survive antibiotic therapy in monkeys.
In the present study, researchers used sophisticated techniques to examine culture samples from twelve human patients who had positive antibody tests for Lyme disease and persistent symptoms despite prior or current antibiotic treatment. All twelve patients had positive cultures for Borrelia burgdorferi, even if they were currently taking antibiotics.

Infection Found in Patients with Persistent Symptoms of Lyme Disease

The presence of live spirochetes in symptomatic patients supports the role of ongoing infection in these patients. A study by an international team of researchers has found persistent infection despite antibiotic therapy in patients with ongoing symptoms of Lyme disease. The study was published in the open access journal Healthcare (Basel) ( http://www.mdpi.com/2227-9032/6/2/33/pdf).

 

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18 dec

Variable manifestations, diverse seroreactivity and post-treatment persistence in non-human primates exposed to Borrelia burgdorferi by tick feeding

Variable manifestations, diverse seroreactivity and post-treatment persistence in non-human primates exposed to Borrelia burgdorferi by tick feeding

The efficacy and accepted regimen of antibiotic treatment for Lyme disease has been a point of significant contention among physicians and patients. While experimental studies in animals have offered evidence of post-treatment persistence of Borrelia burgdorferi, variations in methodology, detection methods and limitations of the models have led to some uncertainty with respect to translation of these results to human infection.

Late Disseminated Lyme Disease: Associated Pathology and Spirochete Persistence Post-Treatment in Rhesus Macaques. – PubMed – NCBI

Am J Pathol. 2017 Dec 11. pii: S0002-9440(17)30894-5. doi: 10.1016/j.ajpath.2017.11.005. [Epub ahead of print]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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19 okt

Controversies in Persistent (Chronic) Lyme Disease

Controversies in Persistent (Chronic) Lyme Disease

The volume of evidence supporting persistent infection is substantial. Persistent infection has been demonstrated in patients with Lyme disease by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and culture.48–58 An NIH-sponsored xenodiagnostic study in humans documented that uninfected ticks acquired B burgdorferi deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) from feeding on a persistently symptomatic patient who had been treated for Lyme disease more than 1 year earlier. This finding is significant.

Controversies in Persistent (Chronic) Lyme Disease

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that more than 300 000 new cases of Lyme disease occur each year in the United States and that 10% to 20% of these patients will remain symptomatic despite receiving appropriate antibiotic therapy. …

 

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16 okt

First Officially Recognized Report on Violations of Lyme Patients’ Human Rights is Released

UPDATING ICD11 Borreliosis Diagnostic Codes – First Officially Recognized Report on Violations of Lyme Patients’ Human Rights is Released

For more information, contact Jenna Luché-Thayer

email: jennaluche@gmail.com

I have some exciting news about our report that was submitted to United Nations!

As you may know, I founded an international Ad Hoc Committee of scientists, medical professionals, human rights experts and patient advocates to document the human right violations experienced by Lyme and relapsing fever borreliosis patients.

This report, UPDATING ICD11 Borreliosis Diagnostic Codes, was submitted to the World Health Organization and the United Nations Human Rights Council’s Special Rapporteur for health and human rights.

The Special Rapporteur then invited our team to Geneva, Switzerland to testify on the human right violations experienced by Lyme and relapsing fever borreliosis patients. The human rights violations include the obstruction to treatment options that meet international standards for clinical guidelines and the denial of coverage for many serious complications and disability caused by Lyme borreliosis.

The report was entered into record by the Special Rapporteur – this is the first officially recognized documentation of the human rights violations experienced by this patient group.

UPDATING ICD11 Borreliosis Diagnostic Codes :

(1) describes the nature of these abuses

(2) details how the WHO’s outdated diagnostic codes —known as the International Classification of Diseases (ICD) codes— for Lyme and relapsing fever borreliosis contribute to these violations

(3) provides the peer-reviewed science concerning the many complications from Lyme, including those that result from latent and seronegative infection

(4) describes how the codes need to be updated—the updates should follow same ICD code logic used by WHO for syphilis, a similar spirochetal infection that has many of the same complications including congenital transmission and systemic complications that may disable and be fatal

UPDATING ICD11 Borreliosis Diagnostic Codes is now available for purchase of $25.00 (plus shipping) on CreateSpace eStore and will be available on Amazon Europe and Amazon.com by October 19, 2017.

We are an entirely voluntary organization – all proceeds from the sale of this report will be used to support our on-going efforts.

Please know I also have some videos that further describe what these efforts mean … and will release another video on how this report is changing the understanding of the epidemic.

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05 sep

Empirical validation of the Horowitz Multiple Systemic Infectious Disease Syndrome Questionnaire for suspected Lyme disease

Empirical validation of the Horowitz Multiple Systemic Infectious Disease Syndrome Questionnaire for suspected Lyme disease

The results consistently demonstrated that the HMQ accurately differentiated those with Lyme disease from healthy individuals. Three migratory pain survey items (persistent muscular pain, arthritic pain, and nerve pain/paresthesias) robustly identified individuals with verified Lyme disease. The results support the use of the HMQ as a valid, efficient, and low-cost screening tool for medical practitioners to decide if additional testing is warranted to distinguish between Lyme disease and other illnesses.

 

Empirical validation of the Horowitz Multiple Systemic Infectious Dise | IJGM

Empirical validation of the Horowitz Multiple Systemic Infectious Disease Syndrome Questionnaire for suspected Lyme disease Maryalice Citera,1 Phyllis R Freeman,2 Richard I Horowitz2 1Department of Psychology, State University of New York at New Paltz, New Paltz, NY, 2Hudson Valley Healing Arts Center, Hyde Park, NY, USA Purpose: Lyme disease is spreading worldwide, with multiple Borrelia species causing a broad range of clinical symptoms that mimic other illnesses.

 

HMQ for Lyme disease – Video Abstract ID 140224

Video abstract of original research paper “Empirical validation of the Horowitz Multiple Systemic Infectious Disease Syndrome Questionnaire for suspected Lyme disease” published in the open access journal International Journal of General Medicine by authors Citera M, Freeman PR, Horowitz RI.

 

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18 nov

Insufficient evidence to deny antibiotic treatment to chronic Lyme disease patients

Insufficient evidence to deny antibiotic treatment to chronic Lyme disease patients.

This hypothesis suggests that physicians should consider the limitations of the evidence before denying antibiotic treatment for CLD. Physicians who deny antibiotic treatment to CLD patients might inform their patients that there are some clinicians who disagree with that position, and then offer to refer them for a second opinion to a doctor who could potentially present a different point of view. The hypothesis also suggests that health care insurers should consider the limitations of the evidence before adopting policies that routinely deny antibiotic treatment for CLD patients and should expand coverage of CLD to include clinical discretion for specific clinical situations.

Cameron DJ1.

Insufficient evidence to deny antibiotic treatment to chronic Lyme disease patients. – PubMed – NCBI

Med Hypotheses. 2009 Jun;72(6):688-91. doi: 10.1016/j.mehy.2009.01.017. Epub 2009 Mar 5.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The severity, length of illness, and cost of chronic Lyme disease (CLD) have been well described. A number of oral, intravenous, and intramuscular antibiotics have been prescribed for CLD. Surprisingly few antibiotic schedules prescribed for the treatment of CLD have been evaluated in randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trials (RCTs). Physicians have increasingly turned to clinical treatment guideline (CPG) panels to judge the mixed results of the evidence. Two CPG panels have looked at the evidence only to reach opposite conclusions: (1) antibiotic therapy for CLD is not effective and (2) antibiotic therapy for CLD is effective. Physicians have been advised by guideline developers to use clinical discretion in diagnosing and treating CLD. Nevertheless, many health insurers – relying exclusively upon only one CPG – have a policy of automatically denying antibiotics to CLD patients regardless of the specifics of each case or the recommendations of the patient’s physician.

HYPOTHESES:

This paper examined the eight limitations of the evidence used to conclude that antibiotics therapy for CLD is not effective in forming the following hypothesis: insufficient evidence to deny antibiotic treatment to CLD patients.

EVIDENCE FOR THE HYPOTHESIS:

There are eight limitations that support the hypothesis: (1) the power of the evidence is inadequate to draw definite conclusions, (2) the evidence is too heterogeneous to make strong recommendations, (3) the risk to an individual of facing a long-term debilitating illness has not been considered, (4) the risk to society of a growing chronically ill population has not been considered, (5) treatment delay has not been considered as a confounder, (6) co-infections have not been considered as a confounder, (7) the design of RCTs did not address the range of treatment options in an actual practice, and (8) the findings cannot be generalized to actual practice.

IMPLICATIONS OF THE HYPOTHESES:

This hypothesis suggests that physicians should consider the limitations of the evidence before denying antibiotic treatment for CLD. Physicians who deny antibiotic treatment to CLD patients might inform their patients that there are some clinicians who disagree with that position, and then offer to refer them for a second opinion to a doctor who could potentially present a different point of view. The hypothesis also suggests that health care insurers should consider the limitations of the evidence before adopting policies that routinely deny antibiotic treatment for CLD patients and should expand coverage of CLD to include clinical discretion for specific clinical situations.

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16 nov

Seroprevalence of Borrelia burgdorferi, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, and Francisella tularensis Infections in Belgium: Results of Three Population-Based Samples

Seroprevalence of Borrelia burgdorferi, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, and Francisella tularensis Infections in Belgium: Results of Three Population-Based Samples.

De Keukeleire M1,2, Vanwambeke SO1, Cochez C3, Heyman P3, Fretin D4, Deneys V5, Luyasu V2, Kabamba B6, Robert A2.

“The seroprevalence of Bb was 5.4% in workers professionally exposed, 2.9% in rural blood donors, and 2.6% in urban blood donors.”

LBBP: Het gaat hier over België! Als test werd de ELISA-test gebruikt, die een ac300px-adhesioncuraatheid heeft van ergens tussen de 40% en 60%, dus waarschijnlijk ligt het aantal positieve gevallen een heel stuk hoger dan die 3%. Er is dringend nood aan meer accurate testen, om een juist beeld te krijgen van het aantal effectieve besmettingen. En zolang er geen 100% betrouwbare testen zijn, blijft een klinische diagnose, vaak onbestaande bij artsen, bijzonder noodzakelijk.

Abstract

To estimate the seroprevalence of Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb), Anaplasma phagocytophilum (Ap), and Francisella tularensis (Ft) in Belgium, we tested sera from three population-based samples in which exposure to pathogen is assumed to vary: 148 samples from workers professionally exposed, 209 samples from rural blood donors, and 193 samples from urban blood donors. Sera were tested using ELISA or the immunofluorescence assay test. The seroprevalence of Bb was 5.4% in workers professionally exposed, 2.9% in rural blood donors, and 2.6% in urban blood donors, which is similar to other studies. The fraction of negative results decreases significantly from urban blood donors and rural blood donors to workers. Regarding the seroprevalence of Ap, the cutoff titer of 1:64 recommended by the manufacturer may be set too low and produces artificially high seroprevalence rates. Using a cutoff titer of 1:128, the seroprevalence of Ap was estimated at 8.1% for workers professionally exposed, 6.2% for rural blood donors, and 5.7% for urban blood donors. Tularemia sera confirmed the presence of the pathogen in Belgium at 2.0% for workers and 0.5% for rural and urban blood donors. Our study is one of the few providing an estimation of the seroprevalences of Bb, Ap, and Ft in three different populations in Belgium, filling the gap in seroprevalence data among those groups. Our findings provide evidence that the entire Belgian population is exposed to Bb, Ap, and Ft infections, but a higher exposure is noticed for professionals at risk. Education on the risk factors for tick bites and preventive measures for both professionals exposed and the general population is needed.

 

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26 jul

Study Confirms that Lyme Disease May Be Sexually Transmitted

Culture and identification of Borrelia spirochetes in human vaginal and seminal secretions

PDF

Marianne J. Middelveen1Jennie Burke2Eva Sapi3Cheryl Bandoski3Katherine R. Filush3Yean Wang2Agustin Franco2Arun Timmaraju3Hilary A. Schlinger1Peter J. Mayne1Raphael B. Stricker1

Study Confirms that Lyme Disease May Be Sexually Transmitted

“Our findings will change the way Lyme disease is viewed by doctors and patients,” said Marianne Middelveen, lead author of the published study. “It explains why the disease is more common than one would think if only ticks were involved in transmission.”

In the study, researchers tested semen samples and vaginal secretions from three groups of people: control subjects without evidence of Lyme disease, individual patients who tested positive for Lyme disease, and couples engaging in unprotected sex who tested positive for the disease.

As expected, all of the control subjects tested negative for Borrelia burgdorferi in cultures of semen samples or vaginal secretions. In contrast, twelve of thirteen patients with Lyme disease had positive cultures for Borrelia burgdorferi in their genital secretions. Furthermore, two of the couples with Lyme disease showed identical strains of the Lyme spirochete in their semen and vaginal secretions, while a third couple showed identical strains of a related Borrelia spirochete in their genital secretions.

“The presence of live spirochetes in genital secretions and identical strains in sexually active couples strongly suggests that sexual transmission of Lyme disease occurs,” said Dr. Mayne, who recently published the first comprehensive study of Lyme disease in Australia. “We need to do more research to determine the risk of sexual transmission of this syphilis-like organism.”

Carmel, CA – A new study suggests that Lyme disease may be sexually transmitted. The study was presented at the annual Western Regional Meeting of the American Federation for Medical Research, and an abstract of the research was published in the January issue of the Journal of Investigative Medicine.

Lyme disease is a tick-borne infection caused by Borrelia burgdorferi, a type of corkscrew- shaped bacteria known as a spirochete (pronounced spiro’keet). The Lyme spirochete resembles the agent of syphilis, long recognized as the epitome of sexually transmitted diseases. Last summer the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announced that Lyme disease is much more common than previously thought, with over 300,000 new cases diagnosed each year in the United States. That makes Lyme disease almost twice as common as breast cancer and six times more common than HIV/AIDS.

unhappy-couple

“Our findings will change the way Lyme disease is viewed by doctors and patients,” said Marianne Middelveen, lead author of the study presented in Carmel. “It explains why the disease is more common than one would think if only ticks were involved in transmission.”

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06 jun

IDSA publication 1989

IDSA’s Journal, Reviews of Infectious Diseases
• Vol. 11, Supplement 6 • September-October 1989, Lyme Disease and Other Spirochetal Diseases.

The publication describes Lyme disease as a very serious disabling infectious disease.

The description is very different from what they present today. The change occurred after The Dearborn conference in 1994. The disease was redefined then as merely an arthritis of the knee with minor neurological symptoms. The change was done to make it look like a useless vaccine worked when it didn’t work at all. The severe neurological symptoms were eliminated from the definition of Lyme disease because their inclusion would reveal the failure of the Lyme vaccine. The mild nourological complaints could be explained away since many things could cause them. The arthritis could be explained away as an autoimmune disease unrelated to Lyme. The severe neurological symptoms cannot be easily dismissed.

They designed the test so those with the more severe neurological issues would test negative. The severe neuro patients produce fewer antibodies than those with Lyme arthritis so deliberately raising the cutoff value led to most patients testing negative especially the worst neuro-patients.

Lyme disease can be confused with multiple sclerosis, brain tumors, and dementia and can cause heart failure. Lyme can pass from the placenta to an unborn childs organs. Lyme disease has caused birth defects, fetal and infant deaths. Infants can be and have been born with Lyme disease. That hardly sounds like the Lyme disease the IDSA describes now.

PDF van IDSA artikel

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